COMMONS ARCHIVE IS A PERMANENT NEIGHBORHOOD MEMORY BANK AT OAKLAND'S GOLDEN GATE LIBRARY  info@commonsarchive.net

ARE YOU MISSING FROM THE ARCHIVE?

We  will scan your old snapshots, scrapbooks and record your stories to share with the community.  Let future generations know what it is like to live in this neighborhood!

Fridays, November 3, 10, & 17
2-4 pm

Please sign up with library staff for a 30-minute session

OAKLAND'S GOLDEN GATE BRANCH LIBRARY

5606 San Pablo Avenue

North Oakland CA

Questions? 510-597-5023

EMERYVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTO COLLECTION

Klinknerville signage developed by Charles Klinkner, circa 1870, the first large scale real estate developer in North Oakland.

VITAL FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS

Fred Williams, second generation owner of a used appliance store that has been serving the neighborhood since the 1960s.

LASARTEMAY FAMILY ARCHIVES

One of many portraits of Eugene Lasartemay, in recognition of his pioneering work on collecting local African American history.

NEIGHBORHOOD FOOD MARKET

Established in the 1950s, this market has continued to serve the neighborhood in various incarnations. Courtesy the Oakland Public Library’s History Room.

HOME OF THE BLACK PANTHERS

One of half a dozen signs in the neighborhood that commemorate important sites in the Panthers’ history.

NORTH OAKLAND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE COUNCIL

Made up of various North Oakland community stakeholders working to address issues of community violence, the group runs various programs including regular peace walks.

SAN PABLO AVENUE'S CHANGING BUSINESS DISTRICT

One of many photos in the Emeryville Historical Society’s collection documenting the business corridor’s transitions from the late 1800s through today.

WILLIAMS APPLIANCE STORE SINCE 1961

"Pop was just a determined man...He didn’t have to advertise: People remember us just by having 50, 60 appliances out front every day."

FIRST REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER

Charles Klinkner, c. 1880, advertised his real estate development with massive signage as well as  monkeys, dogs, and donkeys decked out in costumes. Courtesy Oakland Museum of California Archive.

EAST BAY NEGRO HISTORICAL SOCIETY LOGO

Their mission was to amplify the history and achievements of African Americans. They hosted many school tours at their storefront museum.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH ALL THE TIME

One of the many articles highlighting the importance and necessity of the Lasartemay’s tireless work. From the archives of the African American Museum and Library of Oakland.

NEIGHBOR-LED WALKING DISCUSSION

One of many tours in which locals share their family history and neighborhood roots. Joanne’s parents were among the first African Americans to purchase a home in the neighborhood in the 1940s.

EAST BAY NEGRO HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Dr. Marcella Ford, an extraordinary educator who advocated for the inclusion of black history in elementary school curriculum, was on the East Bay Negro Historical Society Board. EBNHS first store-front museum, c. 1971.

NEIGHBOR'S PERSONAL ARCHIVE

Laura, a local activist, started the Golden Gate neighborhood group in the 1980s and has preserved photos, newsletters and scrapbooks.

NEIGHBORHOOD IN TRANSITION

This once 'forgotten' area of Oakland is now one of the hottest real estate markets in the Bay Area with some of the city’s oldest Victorians undergoing massive transformation.

THE OAKLAND HISTORY ROOM

One of the few library resources to still use a card catalog, the History Room’s knowledgeable staff guides users to their enormous collection including clipping files, photos, journals and rare books.